Analysis of hull shape effects on hydrodynamic drag in Offshore Handicap Racing Rules

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TypeArticle
Conference16th Chesapeake Sailing Yacht Symposium, March 21-22, 2003, Annapolis, Maryland
SubjectAMERICAP; hydrodynamic; residuary resistance
AbstractUS Sailing and the Institute for Marine Dynamics (IMD) in St. John?s, Newfoundland, are collaborating in a joint research program to investigate the effects of hull shape variations on hydrodynamic drag. The results of this program are being used to support the development of rules that handicap racing yachts. A fleet of 9 models has been designed with systematic variations in the most fundamental parameters: displacement and beam for fixed length. Six of those models have been tested both appended and bare-hull, in calm water and head seas. Analysis of residuary resistance, both upright and heeled, has been used to improve the Velocity Prediction Programs (VPPs) employed by both the International Measurement System (IMS) and AMERICAP rules.results of this program are being used to support the development of rules that handicap racing yachts. A fleet of 9 models has been designed with systematic variations in the most fundamental parameters: displacement and beam for fixed length. Six of those models have been tested both appended and bare-hull, in calm water and head seas. Analysis of residuary resistance, both upright and heeled, has been used to improve the Velocity Prediction Programs (VPPs) employed by both the International Measurement System (IMS) and AMERICAP rules.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Ocean Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
IdentifierIR-2003-02
NRC number5571
NPARC number8896243
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Record identifier4f4c3e9c-668e-486f-81f4-1a9226f2d374
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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