Flux engineering for indium tin oxide nanotree crystal alignment and height-dependent branch orientation

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Flux engineering for indium tin oxide nanotree crystal alignment and height-dependent branch orientation (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/cg3013798
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleCrystal Growth and Design
ISSN1528-7483
Volume13
Issue1
Pages212219; # of pages: 8
SubjectAzimuthal orientation; Biaxial textures; Competitive growth; Crystal texture; Dynamic controls; Glancing Angle Deposition; Growth surfaces; In-plane orientation; Indium tin oxide; Nanotrees; Oriented structure; Out-of-plane; Pole figure; Preferential orientation; Substrate rotation; Vapor fluxes; Vapor-liquid-solid growth; Alignment; Indium compounds; Nanowires; Vapors; X-ray diffraction; Crystal orientation
AbstractSingle-crystal indium tin oxide (ITO) nanotrees with engineered trunk and branch orientations are grown using a recently reported technique combining vapor-liquid-solid growth and glancing angle deposition (VLS-GLAD). In this work, three unique capabilities of VLS-GLAD are demonstrated for the first time: (i) nanotrees are aligned without epitaxy, (ii) branches can be placed on select faces of the nanotree trunk, and (iii) branch orientation can be modified along the height of nanotrees. VLS-GLAD uses a collimated obliquely incident vapor flux to place material on desired growth surfaces, resulting in preferential branch growth on the sides of the nanotree trunk exposed to the flux at the time of nucleation. Dynamic control of the azimuthal orientation of the flux relative to a growing nanotree enables the preferential orientation of branches to be modulated along the height of the nanotree, which we have demonstrated with both continuous and discrete substrate rotation schemes. An electron diffraction investigation confirms that the nanotrees can be considered as a single crystal, with continuity of the crystal structure across the trunk-branch interface. Crystal texture of the films is characterized by X-ray diffraction pole figures. By limiting the flux to discrete positions, the films develop both out-of-plane and in-plane crystal alignment (biaxial texture). We interpret the in-plane orientation as the result of competitive growth, which leads to evolutionary selection of similarly oriented structures. Control over in-plane nanotree crystal alignment and height-dependent branch orientation should increase the achievable complexity in three-dimensional nanowire architectures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Security and Disruptive Technologies
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271794
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier4fd1c8ce-6b49-4d09-9c0b-e85570c7c00c
Record created2014-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)