Factors involved in hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose by Acetivibrio cellulolyticus

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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume53
Pages304308; # of pages: 5
AbstractAcetivibrio cellulolyticus cellulase obtained by the water elution of residual cellulose from the growth medium was compared with the cellulase activity present in culture supernatants. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that water elution released most of the protein bands which adhered to undigested cellulose from the culture medium. The enzyme in the culture supernatant and that eluted from residual cellulose had specific activities for Avicel hydrolysis that were 20- to 40-fold greater than that of Trichoderma reesei cellulase. However, Ca and a reducing agent such as dithiothreitol were required for maximum Avicel hydrolysis rates by these A. cellulolyticus enzyme preparations. The effect of these agents on p-nitrophenyl lactopyranoside hydrolysis suggested that they were required by an exoglucanase component. Supernatant enzyme preparations contained large amounts of carbohydrate which was separated from most of the cellulase protein by phenyl-Sepharose chromatography. Removal of this carbohydrate, which interfered with protein fractionations, allowed for an activity stain analysis of the supernatant enzyme.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Biological Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NRC numberMACKENZIE1987A
26763
NPARC number9375115
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Record identifier510d2858-8446-41f1-99cd-b11244a10b59
Record created2009-07-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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