A comparison of four methods to evaluate the effect of a utility residential air-conditioner load control program on peak electricity use

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.enpol.2011.07.038
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TypeArticle
Journal titleEnergy Policy
Volume39
Issue10
Pages63766389; # of pages: 14
SubjectLighting
AbstractIn this program, participant thermostats were increased by 2°C for four hours on five event days (when system wide capacity was expected to be strained). We used hourly, whole-house data for 195 load control participant households and 268 non-participant households, and four different methods of analysis ranging from simple spreadsheet-based comparisons of average loads on event days, to complex time-series regression. Average peak load reductions were 0.2- 0.9 kW per household, or 10- 35%. However, there were large differences (up to a factor of four) between event days and across event hours, and in results for the same event day/hour with different analysis methods. There was also a wide range of load reductions between individual households. Policy makers would be wise to consider multiple analysis methods when making decisions regarding which demand-side management programs to support, and how they might be incentivized. Further investigation of what type of households contribute most to aggregate load reductions would also help policy makers better target programs.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number54019
21618
NPARC number20386633
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Record identifier511800cb-19b6-4526-86ab-381ff017129c
Record created2012-07-25
Record modified2016-05-09
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