Development of a simple and high-yielding fed-batch process for the production of influenza vaccines

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2009.10.048
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TypeArticle
Journal titleVaccine
Volume28
Issue2
Pages309316; # of pages: 8
SubjectBaculovirus; bio; Biotechnology; Cells; expresSF+ cells; Fed-batch cultures; FluBlok-«; Hemagglutinin; Influenza; Influenza vaccine; Protein; Proteins
AbstractA robust and reliable GMP-compatible fed-batch process was successfully developed for the production of recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA) proteins by expresSF™ cells. The feeding solution, feeding strategy as well as the cell density at infection were optimized to maximize the final rHA production yields without affecting the existing rHA recovery protocol and downstream process. A simple and stable feeding solution was formulated and a rational feeding regimen designed to yield, depending on the rHA baculovirus used, between 2- and 3-fold enhancements in volumetric rHA production with increased specific productivity compared to the batch culture. Recombinant HA from fed-batch cultures could be simply recovered following cell lysis and purified through chromatographic steps. Overall, the increased rHA yield was maintained throughout the whole process. The performance, reproducibility and scalability of the fed-batch process was successfully demonstrated in 12 bioreactor runs of 2- and 10-L working volume using five different rHA encoding baculoviruses.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Biotechnology Research Institute
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number52740
NPARC number13948701
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Record identifier51a1acfa-b8da-4f68-a438-a5d0727f4aa2
Record created2010-11-05
Record modified2016-05-09
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