Experimental assessment of a water-film-thickness weber number for scaling of glaze icing

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.2514/6.2001-836
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Proceedings title39th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit
Series titleAIAA Paper
Conference39th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Jan. 8-11, 2001, Reno, Nevada, U.S.A.
ISSN0146-3705
Article numberAIAA 201-0836
Pages113; # of pages: 13
Subjectaircraft icing; icing scaling
AbstractAIAA 2001-0836: The evidence indicates that current practices for scaling of glaze icing tests do not recognize one or more important parameters. A Weber number based on a measure of the thickness of the liquid water film formed on the surface of the accreting ice has been proposed in another paper as the required additional scaling parameter. The present paper reports on experiments specifically designed to assess this proposal. Icing wind tunnel tests were done on 45 mm and 20 mm circular cylinders; the former constituted the reference cases and the latter, the sub-scale cases. In all sub-scale tests the accumulation parameter, the droplet inertia parameter and the calculated freezing fraction were made equal to the corresponding reference values. Freestream velocity for sub-scale test runs was chosen using several scaling parameters, including the newly proposed one. It was found that reasonably good similarity of ice accretion shapes was obtained for all of the sub-scale velocities that were tried, provided that the freestream static temperature was the same as that in the reference case. Possible explanations are suggested. When sub-scale freestream static temperature was the same as the reference value, the freestream velocities determined using Weber numbers based on water-film thickness and on droplet size were approximately equal, and this velocity gave marginally better similarity of ice shapes than velocities chosen on other bases. Solid aluminum and solid Plexiglas models gave essentially the same ice shapes for corresponding conditions. Most of the findings of the work are very preliminary and much more work is required to explore them.
Publication date
PublisherAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Aerospace Research
Access conditionavailable
unclassified
unlimited
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberAL-2001-0124
NPARC number8928862
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Record identifier51dc0285-dc74-46f6-894b-326a75f937b7
Record created2009-04-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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