Screening-level estimates of indoor exposure to volatile organic compounds emitted from building materials

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2014.01.018
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBuilding and Environment
ISSN0360-1323
Volume75
Pages5866; # of pages: 9
SubjectVOC; diffusion coefficient; chamber test; characteristic emission rate
AbstractKnowing the value of the key mass-transfer model parameters is a critical requirement for evaluating volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from indoor materials. The key parameters are diffusion coefficient (D), partition coefficient (K), and initial material-phase emittable concentration (C0). Although these parameters can be individually measured in the laboratory, the required time and expense are substantial. A simple method of determining D and C0 using data from ventilated chamber tests and dimensionless analysis is proposed and then validated using VOC emission data from the material emissions database developed by National Research Council Canada (NRC). The primary application of this method is to provide a rapid screening-level estimate of inhalation exposure to VOCs in building materials. Two standard scenarios using the NRC database are employed to demonstrate the value of the approach to indoor air quality assessment. The method could be a useful screening tool for assessing material emissions or environmental exposures. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Construction
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberNRC-CONST-56160
NPARC number21272169
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Record identifier52117aab-30f7-4d95-a844-7a1de82e007e
Record created2014-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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