First-order melting of a weak spin-orbit Mott insulator into a correlated metal

Download
  1. (PDF, 778 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: First-order melting of a weak spin-orbit Mott insulator into a correlated metal (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.257203
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titlePhysical Review Letters
ISSN0031-9007
1079-7114
Volume114
Issue25
SubjectMagnetic susceptibility; Phase separation Antiferromagnetics; Electronic phase diagram; First-order melting; La substitutions; Mott insulators; Nano-scale phase separation; Spin susceptibility; Structural distortions
AbstractThe electronic phase diagram of the weak spin-orbit Mott insulator (Sr₁−xLax)₃Ir₂O₇ is determined via an exhaustive experimental study. Upon doping electrons via La substitution, an immediate collapse in resistivity occurs along with a narrow regime of nanoscale phase separation comprised of antiferromagnetic, insulating regions and paramagnetic, metallic puddles persisting until x≈0.04. Continued electron doping results in an abrupt, first-order phase boundary where the Néel state is suppressed and a homogenous, correlated, metallic state appears with an enhanced spin susceptibility and local moments. As the metallic state is stabilized, a weak structural distortion develops and suggests a competing instability with the parent spin-orbit Mott state.
Publication date
PublisherAmerican Physical Society
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationSecurity and Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001058
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier52705cc0-e17a-4735-a2b2-c0250cf7e564
Record created2016-12-06
Record modified2016-12-06
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)