Agglomeration of Athabasca petroleum cokes in the presence of various additives as a means of reducing sulfur emissions during combustion

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TypeArticle
Journal titleACS-Division of Fuel Chemistry Preprints
Volume32
Issue4
Pages412432; # of pages: 21
AbstractThe relatively high sulfur content of coke produced during the upgrading of Athabasca bitumen, makes it environmentally unsuitable as a fuel. We have attempted to coagglomerate these cokes with sulphur dioxide capture agents such as: lime, hydrated lime and limestone in an attempt to reduce emissions during combustion. By providing an environment where there is intimate contact between fuel and sorbent it was hoped that greater utilisation of the sorbent could be achieved, compared to fluid bed combustion, where the sorbent is added separately to the bed. Cokes from both Suncor and Syncrude operations were used in this investigation. The effect of conditioning agents such as sodium hydroxide, sodium oleate, and a petroleum sulfonate on the formation of coke oil agglomerates as well as on the efficiency of sulfur dioxide capture was also investigated. Sulfur dioxide capture was found to depend mainly on the calcium to sufur mole ratio in the agglomerates, the combustion temperature, partial pressure of oxygen, and the type of coke and sorbent. The efficiency of the three capture agents in the reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions, has been compared.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC)
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number28258
NPARC number15677135
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Record identifier53054161-fdf1-468b-b1e2-d0112d8a12b5
Record created2010-06-14
Record modified2016-05-09
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