Durability of cement and glass impregnated with sulfur and polymethyl methacrylate

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/0008-8846(82)90027-8
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCement and Concrete Research
ISSN0008-8846
Volume12
IssueSeptember 5
Pages649659; # of pages: 11
Subjectimpregnation; sulfur; glasses (materials); impregnated cement; durability; portland cement; porous glass sulfur-impregnated bodies instability; non-isotropic expansion; impregnant - adsorbate interaction; stable impregnant polymethyl methacrylate; Concrete
AbstractPossible causes of instability of sulfur-impregnated bodies ( porous glass and portland cement) have been investigated. As they are non-crystalline and have a large surface-to- volume ratio, impregnants in small pores are normally in a metastable state unless their free energy is lowered by meniscus effects or interaction with the matrix. Extrusion of sulfur on exposure to water or other adsorbing vapors occurs because of the weak interaction between impregnant and the siliceous surface and a lubricating effect created by the presence of the adsorbate on the surface of the impregnant. Non-isotropic expansion and impregnant- adsorbate interaction are suggested as the main causes of mechanical breakdown. Good interaction with the surface and resistance to flow due to cross-linking render polymethyl methacrylate a stable impregnant.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierDBR-P-1046
NRC number20518
3327
NPARC number20375169
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Record identifier53be8c9f-9529-48ca-a576-436536cc72e0
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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