Superparamagnetic iron oxide does not affect the viability and function of adipose-derived stem cells, and superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging identifies viable cells

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.mri.2008.05.013
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TypeArticle
Journal titleMagnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume27
Issue1
Pages108119; # of pages: 12
SubjectAdipose-derived stem cells; Magnetic resonance imaging; Superparamagnetic iron oxide; Transdifferentiation; Viability
AbstractThe objectives of this study were (1) to determine whether superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) affects viability, transdifferentiation potential and cell-factor secretion of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs); and (2) to determine whether SPIO-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging highlights living stem cells. Rat ASCs were incubated in SPIO-containing cell culture medium for 2 days. The SPIO-treated ASCs were then subjected to adipogenic, osteogenic and myogenic transdifferentiation. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and insulin-like growth factor 1 by the SPIO-treated ASCs was measured using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Cell viability was assessed using trypan blue stain. For in vivo experiments, SPIO-labeled ASCs were injected into 10 rat hearts. The hearts were monitored using MRI. We found that survival rate of the ASCs cultured in the SPIO-containing medium was very high (97–99%). The SPIO-treated ASCs continued to express specific markers for the three types of transdifferentiation. Expression of the cell factors by the ASCs was not affected by SPIO. Signal voids on MR images were associated with the living SPIO-labeled ASCs in the rat hearts. We conclude that SPIO does not affect viability, transdifferentiation potential or cell-factor secretion of ASCs. MRI mainly highlights living SPIO-labeled stem cells.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biodiagnostics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number20209243
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Record identifier53c8ed14-208f-420b-906d-69eb4af4f51f
Record created2012-06-25
Record modified2016-05-09
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