A model for hydrated portland cement paste as deduced from sorption-length change and mechanical properties

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TypeArticle
Journal titleMateriaux et constructions. Materials and Structures
ISSN0025-5432
Volume1
Issue6
Pages509520; # of pages: 12
Subjecthydrated cement; portland cement; mechanical properties; adsorption; Concrete; ciment hydrate; ciment portland; propriete mecanique; adsorption
AbstractRecent findings in DBR and other laboratories have made it necessary here to revise the accepted model for hydrated portland cement paste. The model recognizes surface areas and porosities obtained by N[2] adsorption as the most reliable values, and attributes many of the phenomena observed, to the behaviour of interlayer hydrate water. The bonds between and within individual "crystallites" are clearly defined; it is shown that the "inter-crystallite" bonds do not separate when exposed to physically adsorbed water. The paper describes some of the thermodynamic equations pertinent to the phenomena of adsorption, length change and creep, and some basic principles governing physical adsorption and types of hystereses. The results were obtained from two areas of work: A. Surface chemical experiments. B. Measurement of mechanical properties of compacted and cast systems of hydrated cement and gypsum.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierDBR-RP-400
NRC number10707
3292
NPARC number20375117
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Record identifier53e1e9d1-4148-4dbe-a0e9-443ac9e59c42
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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