Stachybotrys chartarum alters surfactant-related phospholipid synthesis and CTP : cholinephosphate cytidyltransferase activity in isolated fetal rat type II cells

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Stachybotrys chartarum alters surfactant-related phospholipid synthesis and CTP : cholinephosphate cytidyltransferase activity in isolated fetal rat type II cells (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfi045
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleToxicological Sciences
ISSN1096-6080
1096-0929
Volume84
Issue1
Pages186194; # of pages: 9
AbstractStachybotry chartarum, a fungal contaminant of water-damaged buildings commonly grows on damp cellulose-containing materials. It produces a complex array of mycotoxins. Their mechanisms of action on the pulmonary system are not entirely clear. Previous studies suggest spore products may depress formation of disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), the major surface-active component of pulmonary surfactant (PS). If S. chartarum can indeed affect formation of this phospholipid, then mold exposure may be a significant issue for pulmonary function in both mature lung and developing fetal lung. To address this possibility, fetal rat type II cells, the principal source of DSPC, were used to assess effects of S. chartarum extract on formation of DSPC. Isolated fetal rat lung type II cells prelabeled with 3H-choline and incubated with spore extract showed decreased incorporation of 3H-choline into DSPC. The activity of CTP:cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase (CPCT), the rate-limiting enzyme in phosphatidylcholine synthesis was reduced by approximately 50% by a 1:10 dilution of spore extract. Two different S. chartarum extracts (isolates from S. chartarum (Cleveland) and S. chartarum (Hawaiian)) were used to compare activity of CPCT in the presence of phosphatidylglycerol (PG), a known activator. PG produced an approximate two-fold increase in CPCT activity. The spore isolate from Hawaii did not alter enzyme activity. S. chartarum (Cleveland) eliminated the PG-induced activation of CPCT. These results support previous observations that mold products alter PS metabolism and may pose a risk in developing lung, inhibiting surfactant synthesis. Different isolates of the same species of fungus are not equivalent in terms of potential exposure risks.
Publication date
PublisherSociety of Toxicology
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number2216
NPARC number9742609
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier54318978-780d-40a3-8c4c-b79eac09bb55
Record created2009-07-17
Record modified2016-08-15
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)