Land based multi-trophic aquaculture research at the wave energy research centre

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1109/OCEANS.2014.7003181
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TypeArticle
Proceedings title2014 Oceans - St. John's
Series titleOceans ... Conference
ConferenceOCEANS'14 MTS/IEEE St. John's, 14-19 September, 2014, St. John's, NL
ISSN0197-7385
ISBN978-1-4799-4920-5
978-1-4799-4918-2
Subjectaquaculture; wave energy integrated multi-trophic aquaculture; IMTA
AbstractThe collapse of the Atlantic cod fishery in the 1990s devastated the economies of many coastal Newfoundland communities. While many have survived through a combination of a much reduced fishery, government funding, and off shore or out of province employment, none of these are sustainable longterm solutions. Sea-based aquaculture (“fish farming” in pens) has provided stable employment in some areas, but only where there are suitable sites with protected, deep inlets with significant tidal or river current flushing. These geographic characteristics are not usually compatible with prosecuting the inshore fishery. Sites that were close to the open fishing grounds with minimal near shore currents were prized by the small boat fishers, but wind and wave protection were a secondary concern. Thus there are many towns and villages that are significant distances from ideal sea-based aquaculture sites.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationOcean, Coastal and River Engineering; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberOCRE-PR-2014-014
NPARC number21277589
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Record identifier543d494b-95b1-4c30-ab48-7463b14e29ab
Record created2016-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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