Lightswitch- 2002: a model for manual and automated control of electric lighting and blinds

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.solener.2004.04.003
AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleSolar Energy
Volume77
Issue1
Pages1528; # of pages: 14
Subjectbuilding energy simulation, manual lighting control, blind control, daylighting; Lighting
AbstractA simulation algorithm is proposed that predicts the lighting energy performance of manually and automatically controlled electric lighting and blind systems in private and two-person offices. Algorithm inputs are annual profiles of user occupancy and work plane illuminances. These two inputs are combined with probabilistic switching patterns, which have been derived from field data, in order to predict the status of the electric lighting and blinds throughout the year. The model features four different user types to mimic variation in control behavior between different occupants. An example application in a private office with a southern facade yields that ?depending on the user type? the electric lighting energy demand for a manually controlled electric lighting and blind system ranges from 10 to 39kWh/m2yr. The predicted mean energy savings of a switch-off occupancy sensor in the example office are 20%. Depending on how reliably occupants switch off a dimmed lighting system, mean electric lighting energy savings due to a daylight-linked photocell control range from 60% to zero.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number47022
16210
NPARC number20378201
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Record identifier55855926-4449-4a33-ba2f-b155ee0e2369
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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