The low temperature oxidation of Athabasca oil sand asphaltene observed from 13C, 19F and pulsed field gradient spin-echo proton n.m.r. spectra

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TypeArticle
Journal titleFuel
Volume78
Pages3145; # of pages: 14
SubjectAthabasca oil sand asphaltene; asphaltene; low temperature oxidation; oxidation
AbstractCarbon-13 and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of chemically derivatized, by phase transfer methylation and trifluoroacetylation, Athabasca oil sand asphaltene, reveal a broad site distribution of different types of hydroxyl-containing functional groups, viz., carboxylic acids, phenols, and alcohols. The low temperature air oxidation of asphaltene, at ca. 1308C for 3 days, generates a few additional carboxyl and phenolic groups. These results are consistent with a mechanism in which diaryl methylene and ether moieties react with oxygen. Self-diffusion coefficients, from the pulsed field gradient spin-echo proton magnetic resonance technique, suggest that low temperature oxidation does not appreciably alter the average particle size and diffusion properties of asphaltene in deuterochloroform.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number51988
NPARC number16054708
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Record identifier55e233ba-91f6-4700-9f44-8b274d0ef804
Record created2010-09-08
Record modified2016-05-09
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