Noninvasive assessment of cardiac ischemic injury using 87Rb and 23Na MR imaging, 31P MR, and optical spectroscopy

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/1522-2594(200012)44:6<899::AID-MRM11>3.0.CO;2-7
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TypeArticle
Journal titleMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
ISSN1522-2594
Volume44
Issue6
Pages899908; # of pages: 10
Subjectcardiac ischemia; infarct; MR imaging and spectroscopy; optical spectroscopy; heart
AbstractThe aim of the study was to compare and analyze different noninvasive indices of cell damage in the isolated pig heart model of regional ischemia. We used 23Na and 87Rb MR imaging to evaluate Na+/K+ balance, 31P MR spectroscopy to measure energetics, and optical spectroscopy to assess oxymyoglobin (MbO2). Hearts were subjected to 120-min occlusion of the left anterior descending artery and were then reperfused for 120 min. Reperfusion resulted in an increase in 23Na (37 ± 18% of the posterior wall) and decrease in 87Rb (55 ± 15%) image intensities, partial recovery of PCr, ATP, the total phosphates, and MbO2 in the anterior wall. The above changes are consistent with the irreversible cell damage in the anterior wall, confirmed by lack of staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Changes in Na+ and Rb+ in the infarct area inversely correlated and their ratio is a more sensitive index of cell injury than either of them alone.
Publication date
PublisherWiley-Liss, Inc.
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biodiagnostics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number1848
NPARC number9148277
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Record identifier5671a3fe-05dc-47d6-8475-6d0d8f36b63e
Record created2009-06-25
Record modified2016-10-05
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