Fourier-transform on-chip microspectrometers

DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1109/PIERS.2016.7734234
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TypeArticle
Proceedings title2016 Progress in Electromagnetic Research Symposium (PIERS)
Conference2016 Progress in Electromagnetic Research Symposium (PIERS), August 8-11, 2016, Shanghai, China
ISBN978-1-5090-6093-1
Pages6061
AbstractWe present some of the latest developments in silicon-based Fourier-transform microspectrometers for the near and mid-infrared. The devices comprise waveguide arrays of Mach-Zehnder interferometers with linearly increasing optical path differences, enabling scan-less spectral retrieval with large radiant throughput. Resolutions down to 40pm are experimentally demonstrated. Spatial heterodyne Fourier-transform (SHFT) spectrometry is an interferometric technique which circumvents the need of moving elements and provides an increased έtendue. The SHFT scheme can be implemented with a waveguide array of Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZI) with linearly increasing optical path differences. The high refractive index contrast of the SOI platform and the waveguide bend radius of ~ 5 μm readily allow achieving high resolutions in a reduced footprint. We report three alternative implementations of the SHFT principle in SOI waveguides. Firstly, a SHFT chip with Si-wire microphotonic spirals, reaching a resolution of 40 pm at a central wavelength near 1.5 μm. Secondly, a SHFT micro-spectrometer with subwavelength gratings for refractive index engineering of the optical delay lines. Finally, an extension of the SHFT scheme to the mid-infrared, addressing specific challenges of this spectral region such as efficient coupling and power splitting structures, and robust performance over a substantially broader free spectral range. SHFT spectrometers are promising for a wide range of applications, including chemical and biological sensing, astronomy, communications, hand-held spectroscopy, and sensing from satellites or planetary rowers. Furthermore, the resolution of these devices can be readily scaled up to very long optical delays, opening a new pathway toward possibly overcoming current resolution limits of state-of-the-art spectroscopic instruments.
Publication date
PublisherIEEE
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationInformation and Communication Technologies; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001170
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Record identifier577da6a4-450b-40f2-9a58-aafa7a00ac69
Record created2016-12-21
Record modified2016-12-21
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