Effect of weathering on the water sorption of GRP sheet material

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AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleMateriaux et constructions. Materials and Structures
ISSN0025-5432
Volume18
Issue107
Pages33743; # of pages: 295
Subjectpolyester; reinforced plastics; weatherability; water absorption; glass-reinforced polyester (grp); water sorption-desorption isotherms; relative vapour pressure range; equilibrium sorbed water content; combined mean coefficient of diffusion; Plastics
AbstractWater sorption-desorption isotherms of glass-reinforced polyester (GRP) surface material, unweathered and weathered for periods of up to 6 1/2 years, have been determined over the entire relative vapour pressure range. The equilibrium sorbed water content of the weathered surface material is higher than that of the sheet exposed outdoors for the same length of time, by a factor of up to two. Also, the equilibrium sorbed water content of the degraded surface material increases with weathering time much faster than that of the GRP sheet. Isotherms of GRP sheet indicate that the equilibrium content of sorbed water is consistently higher in weathered samples than in unweathered sheet and is an increasing function of weathering time for periods of outdoor exposure of up to 7 1/2 years. The rates of water sorption and desorption of weathered GRP sheet, as assessed by the combined mean coefficient of diffusion [1/2(Ds+Dd)] increase markedly with weathering time.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-1378
NRC number25925
2120
NPARC number20374720
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Record identifier582f35ce-3688-4f5a-986c-24f4391e6c38
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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