Structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharide from the nontypable Haemophilus influenzae strain SB 33

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TypeArticle
Journal titleEuropean Journal of Biochemistry
Volume268
Issue20
Pages52785286; # of pages: 9
Subjectanalysis; Canada; Carbohydrate Conformation; classification; CORE REGION; Haemophilus influenzae; isolation & purification; Lipopolysaccharides; LPS; Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; mass spectrometry; Methylation; Molecular Sequence Data; NMR; NMR spectroscopy; Oligosaccharides; Phosphorylcholine; REGION; RESIDUES; SERIES; Spectrometry,Mass,Electrospray Ionization; STRAIN; structural analysis; structure; TRISACCHARIDE
AbstractThe structure of the core region of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the nontypable Haemophilus influenzae strain SB 33 was elucidated. The LPS was subjected to a variety of degradative procedures. The structures of the derived oligosaccharide products were established by monosaccharide and methylation analyses, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These analyses revealed a series of related phosphocholine (PCho) containing structures differing in the number of hexose residues. The results pointed to each species containing a conserved phosphoethanolamine (PEtn) substituted heptose-containing trisaccharide inner-core moiety. The major LPS glycoforms were identified as 2-Hex, 3-Hex and 4-Hex species according to the number of hexose residues present
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biological Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberCOX2001
NPARC number9379733
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Record identifier5b00f96f-e71a-43e4-a944-d0d5055310ca
Record created2009-07-10
Record modified2016-06-01
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