Electron transport in gated InGaAs and InAsP quantum well wires in selectively grown InP ridge structures

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.physe.2009.11.062
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePhysica E
Volume42
Issue10
Pages26222627; # of pages: 6
SubjectInP; InAsP; InGaAs; Chemical beam epitaxy; Nanowire; Quantum wire; Ridge structure; Electron transport; Quantum dot; Selective growth
AbstractThe purpose of this work is to fabricate ribbon-like InGaAs and InAsP wires embedded in InP ridge structures and investigate their transport properties. The InP ridge structures that contain the wires are selectively grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) on pre-patterned InP substrates. To optimize the growth and micro-fabrication processes for electronic transport, we explore the Ohmic contact resistance, the electron density, and the mobility as a function of the wire width using standard transport and Shubnikov–de Haas measurements. At low temperatures the ridge structures reveal reproducible mesoscopic conductance fluctuations. We also fabricate ridge structures with submicron gate electrodes that exhibit non-leaky gating and good pinch-off characteristics acceptable for device operation. Using such wrap gate electrodes, we demonstrate that the wires can be split to form quantum dots evidenced by Coulomb blockade oscillations in transport measurements.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number17401045
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Record identifier5b4fc9c7-7173-4b2f-9f10-0a2470620dbb
Record created2011-03-26
Record modified2016-05-09
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