Effects of hydrostatic pressure on the molecular structure and endothermic phase transitions of phosphatidylcholine bilayers: a Raman scattering study

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Effects of hydrostatic pressure on the molecular structure and endothermic phase transitions of phosphatidylcholine bilayers: a Raman scattering study (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/bi00336a043
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleBiochemistry
ISSN0006-2960
1520-4995
Volume24
Issue15
Pages40914096
AbstractThe temperature dependences of the Raman spectra of aqueous dispersions of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) were monitored at different but constant pressures between 1 and 1210 bar. The changes observed in these Raman spectra are discussed in terms of the effects of high pressure on the phase state and molecular structure of lipid bilayers. It is demonstrated that the temperature of the endothermic gel to liquid-crystal phase transition, as well as the temperature of the pretransition, increases linearly with increasing hydrostatic pressure. The dT,/dP values obtained from a wide range of pressures are 20.8 OC-kbar⁻¹ for DPPC and 20.1 OCmkbar⁻¹ for DMPC. The dTp/dP value for DPPC is 16.2 OCºkbar⁻¹. It is also shown that the volume change that occurs at the gel to liquid-crystal transition is not constant; i.e., dΔVm/dP decreases by 6.2% (DPPC) or 6.3% (DMPC) per kilobar pressure. The volutie change at the pretransition is also pressure dependent; the dΔVp/dP value of DPPC decreases by 4.7% per kilobar pressure.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number24102
NPARC number23001699
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier5be47de9-5b9e-45f9-bca1-d79941085d22
Record created2017-03-20
Record modified2017-03-20
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)