Application of the Hough transform for the automatic determination of soot aggregate morphology

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1364/AO.51.000610
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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied Optics
Volume51
Issue5
Pages610620; # of pages: 11
AbstractWe report a new method for automated identification and measurement of primary particles within soot aggregates as well as the sizes of the aggregates and discuss its application to high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of the aggregates. The image processing algorithm is based on an optimized Hough transform, applied to the external border of the aggregate. This achieves a significant data reduction by decomposing the particle border into fragments, which are assumed to be spheres in the present application, consistent with the known morphology of soot aggregates. Unlike traditional techniques, which are ultimately reliant on manual (human) measurement of a small sample of primary particles from a subset of aggregates, this method gives a direct measurement of the sizes of the aggregates and the size distributions of the primary particles of which they are composed. The current version of the algorithm allows processing of high-resolution TEM images by a conventional laptop computer at a rate of 1–2 ms per aggregate. The results were validated by comparison with manual image processing, and excellent agreement was found.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number53021
NPARC number20603075
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Record identifier5cc4b7e4-7c05-4758-b40a-b2661ee416f1
Record created2012-09-12
Record modified2016-05-09
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