The establishment of high current DC shunt calibration system at KRISS and comparison with NRC

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1109/CPEM.2014.6898535
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TypeArticle
Proceedings title2014 Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements (CPEM 2014)
Series titleCPEM Digest
Conference29th Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements, CPEM 2014, 24 August 2014 through 29 August 2014
ISSN0589-1485
ISBN9781479952052
Article number6898535
Pages614615; # of pages: 2
SubjectVoltage measurement; Calibration system; comparison; Current ratios; High currents; Calibration
AbstractThe application of a simple binary step up method for possible calibration of high current DC shunts up to a few thousand amperes in which a pair of HCDC shunts are used to evaluate the current dependence of the shunt resistance. It was found that a complex exponential linear model can be applied to separate the drifts in voltage measurements from the contribution of the current coefficient of the shunt. This approach allows one to extract the information on the current coefficient of the shunt and together with low current measurement of the shunt resistance to calibrate the current output of HCDC source, which in turn can be used as a reference for calibration of customer's shunts. In order to validate the step up method, the calibrated HCDC source was used to obtain DC current ratios which is to be compared with NRC's high current ratio measurements of a multi-ratio 3000 A reference DC CT.
Publication date
PublisherIEEE
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; Measurement Science and Standards
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272838
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Record identifier5d225b5c-97d2-4d2d-8139-1c5546dd16a7
Record created2014-12-03
Record modified2016-05-09
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