Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and enrichment mapping reveal divergent and conserved roles of Sko1 in the Candida albicans osmotic stress response

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and enrichment mapping reveal divergent and conserved roles of Sko1 in the Candida albicans osmotic stress response (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygeno.2013.06.002
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleGenomics
ISSN0888-7543
Volume102
Issue4
Pages363371; # of pages: 9
Subjectphosphotransferase; protein hog1; unclassified drug; article; Candida albicans; computer model; controlled study; DNA binding motif; enzyme activity; gene; gene function; gene mapping; genetic conservation; genetic regulation; genetic transcription; genetic variability; genome analysis; microarray analysis; nonhuman; osmotic stress; priority journal; real time polymerase chain reaction; signal transduction; Sko1 gene; Candida albicans; Saccharomyces cerevisiae
AbstractCandida albicans maintains both commensal and pathogenic states in humans. Here, we have defined the genomic response to osmotic stress mediated by transcription factor Sko1. We performed microarray analysis of a sko1δ/δ mutant strain subjected to osmotic stress, and we utilized gene sequence enrichment analysis and enrichment mapping to identify Sko1-dependent osmotic stress-response genes. We found that Sko1 regulates distinct gene classes with functions in ribosomal synthesis, mitochondrial function, and vacuolar transport. Our in silico analysis suggests that Sko1 may recognize two unique DNA binding motifs. Our C. albicans genomic analyses and complementation studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that Sko1 is conserved as a regulator of carbohydrate metabolism, redox metabolism, and glycerol synthesis. Further, our real time-qPCR results showed that osmotic stress-response genes that are dependent on the kinase Hog1 also require Sko1 for full expression. Our findings reveal divergent and conserved aspects of Sko1-dependent osmotic stress signaling. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Biotechnology Research Institute (BRI-IRB)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269970
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier5e2639a2-199a-426f-9079-e1d8c282ffa5
Record created2013-12-13
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)