Oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for spin-changing S-P transitions in helium: Finite nuclear mass effects

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1088/0953-4075/48/23/235001
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics
ISSN0953-4075
Volume48
Issue23
Article number235001
SubjectMagnetic moments; Anomalous magnetic moment of the electrons; Nuclear mass; Oscillator strengths; Pseudo-state expansion; Radiative decay rates; Relativistic effects; Spontaneous decay rates; Transition operators; Helium
AbstractWe have calculated the electric dipole (E1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) oscillator strengths and spontaneous decay rates for 24 spin-changing transitions of atomic helium. We included the effects of the finite nuclear mass and the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron augmented by the recently derived Pachucki term. The specific transitions for 4He are and with and for For the E1 calculations we used the Breit approximation and pseudostate expansions to perform the perturbation sums over intermediate states in both the length and velocity gauge as a check on both numerical accuracy and validity of the transition operators. The corrections for the nuclear mass and the electron anomaly tend to cancel, indicating that if one is included, then so should be the other. The tables give mass- and anomaly-dependent coefficients permitting the easy generation of results for the other isotopes of helium.
Publication date
PublisherIOP Publishing
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; National Science Infrastructure
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21277425
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Record identifier5eecff8f-ad1d-4349-8e74-4d36781724d4
Record created2016-03-09
Record modified2016-05-09
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