Discovery of new analogs of the marine biotoxin azaspiracid in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Discovery of new analogs of the marine biotoxin azaspiracid in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/rcm.3385
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleRapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry
Volume22
Issue4
Pages549558; # of pages: 10
AbstractAzaspiracids (AZAs) are a group of lipophilic marine biotoxins that were first discovered in blue mussels harvested in 1995 in Killary Harbour on the west coast of Ireland. At least eight people fell ill after the consumption of contaminated mussels and developed symptoms of nausea, stomach cramps, vomiting and severe diarrhoea. Until now, eleven different analogs of these toxins have been described, with a twelfth one theoretically postulated. This paper describes the detection and identification of twenty new analogs of azaspiracid, including dihydroxy-AZAs and carboxy-AZAs, using state-of-the-art techniques including ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) from a toxic event of the northwest coast of Ireland in 2005 were extracted and analysed using LC/MS. The mass spectra obtained from different instruments enabled identification of previously unknown analogs of azaspiracid with additional hydroxyl and carboxyl substituents. Mass fragmentation patterns of the dihydroxy-AZAs indicated the positions of these substituents to be at the C3 and C23 position. The previously theoretically postulated AZA12 was also observed in this study. Product ion spectra showed the presence of a unique fragment ion at m/z 408 for all C23-hydroxylated analogs. This fragmentation competes with the fragmentation leading to m/z 362, a fragment ion that has shown to be present in all AZAs. The novel analogs have not been seen in plankton or water samples and are believed to be metabolites of AZAs formed in mussels. All the new AZA analogs were present at low concentrations in the shellfish and it is probably safe to assume that they do not pose a risk for the shellfish consumer.
Publication date
PublisherWiley
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; National Research Council Canada; Measurement Science and Standards
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number42756
1719
NPARC number3538393
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier5f6c284b-013d-4038-bcbe-56620cf1b438
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)