The Pingos of Prince Patrick Island (76 Degrees N - 120 Degrees W)

  1. (PDF, 2 MB)
  2. Get@NRC: The Pingos of Prince Patrick Island (76 Degrees N - 120 Degrees W) (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI:
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeTechnical Report
Series titleTechnical Translation, National Research Council Canada; Volume 1401
Physical description45 p.
SubjectPermafrost; Soils; arctic regions; landforms; liquification
AbstractMore than 150 pingos have been observed on Prince Patrick Island. The majority of these domes of injected ice may be divided into two distinct groups: The first group is made up of more than 100 pingos located on the surface of the island's summit at an altitude of about 100 metres. They are aligned in two parallel rows of domes, circular in ground plan, whose height and diameter do not exceed 13 metres and 250 metres respectively. Presenting no positive trace of present day evolution and showing no relationship with the topography, these forms exist in the valleys as well as on the summits. They are possibly related to some deep geological structure. The second group of pingos is made up of mounds at an altitude close to sea level and situated at the head of two bays more than 90 km distant from each other. In this group particularly are elongated pingos resembling eskers as well as those with the characteristic circular shape. Observed cuts have shown the arrangement of layers in the sides of the pingos as well as the core of injected ice. They appear to have developed following a definite change of sea level which drowned the bay and resulted in the melting of the upper permafrost. The later re-establishment of the permafrost may have begun with the appearance of this injected ice.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number521
NPARC number20375776
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier5f797150-382a-41ad-907c-1f00996061cf
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-10-03
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)