Fracture Toughness of High Density Polycarbonate Microcellular Foams

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0021955X06063512
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Cellular Plastics
ISSN0021-955X
Volume42
Issue3
Pages229240; # of pages: 11
AbstractMicrocellular foams (MCFs) of polycarbonate (PC) with relative densities of 0.9 and 0.7 (MCF-0.9 and MCF-0.7) are produced by solid-state foaming. Microstructural characterization shows that they have bi-modal distribution of spherical cells, with median cell sizes of 3–4 mm and 6–9 mm for both cell populations. Tensile testing shows that ultimate tensile strength and Young’s modulus approximately ranked with relative density, although MCF-0.9 has a modulus similar to the unfoamed PC (uPC). Toughness measurements show that, when compared to uPC on a critical stress intensity factor basis, MCF-0.9 shows no reduction in toughness and MCF-0.7 shows a 35% reduction. When compared to uPC on strain energy basis, 12–15% increases in toughness are measured for both MCFs. Their fracture occurs by multiple initiation, growth, and coalescence of voids formed at cells acting as stress concentrators. A fine cell morphology results in prolonged growth and coalescence phases, and thus improves fracture toughness.
Publication date
PublisherTECHNOMIC PUBLISHING COMPANY INC
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Industrial Materials Institute
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number50617
NPARC number15905576
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Record identifier60cdfde9-aa90-4edf-9618-d80bb0bda198
Record created2010-08-17
Record modified2016-05-09
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