Biosorption of heavy metals by red algae (Palmaria Palmata)

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/09593332508618378
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TypeArticle
Journal titleEnvironmental Technology
Volume25
Issue10
Pages10971106; # of pages: 10
SubjectBiosorption; heavy metals; red algae; P. palmata
AbstractThe biosorption of heavy metals from aqueous solutions was investigated, using a cheap and abundant dry biomass of red algae P. palmata. The Freundlich, Langmuir and Brunauer Emmer and Teller (BET) models were used to describe the uptake of lead (Pb²⁺), copper (Cu²⁺), nickel (Ni²⁺), cadmium (Cd²⁺) and zinc (Zn²⁺) on P. palmata. The good fits of the Langmuir and BET models to the experimental data reflected that the sorption on P. palmata was a multi-layer sorption, in which a Langmuir equation could be applied to each layer. The highest maximum sorption capacity qmax derived from the Langmuir model was 15.17 mg g⁻¹ for lead and 6.65 mg g⁻¹ for copper (dry weight metal /dry weight biosorbent) at a pH of 5.5-6. The affinity of metals for P. palmata was found to decrease in the order: Pb²⁺ > CO²⁺ > Cu²⁺ > Ni²⁺. The factors influencing copper and lead uptake were found to be contact time, pH, initial concentration and temperature. Biosorption of copper and lead was a rapid process, with 70% and 100% of the respective uptakes occurring within the first 10 minutes.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Biotechnology Research Institute
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number47196
NPARC number3538677
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Record identifier62efdcaf-7b71-41b9-9358-ace0f2635bee
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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