Resonant laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis of lead traces in copper alloys

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/c1ja10112a
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry
ISSN0267-9477
Volume26
Issue12
Pages24522460; # of pages: 9
SubjectExperimental parameters; Fluences; Fluorescence signals; Laser fluences; Laser shots; Laser wavelength; Lead atom; Limit of detection; Nonresonant; Optimal conditions; Parts per millions; Signal to noise; Vapor plumes; Atmospheric pressure; Atomic emission spectroscopy; Cerium alloys; Copper; Copper alloys; Lead; Optical parametric oscillators; Optical tomography; Signal to noise ratio; Chemical detection
AbstractResonant laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (RLIBS) was investigated to improve the limit of detection (LoD) of lead traces in copper alloys. A 5-ns optical parametric oscillator laser pulse was used to ablate the sample (front edge of the pulse) and resonantly excite the lead atoms in the vapor plume (rear edge of the pulse). The laser was tuned to the Pb I 283.31 nm line and the Stokes direct-line fluorescence signal at 405.78 nm was recorded. The experiments were performed in air at atmospheric pressure. The influence of the main experimental parameters, namely the laser wavelength, laser fluence and acquisition delay, on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the Pb I 405.78 nm line was studied experimentally. We found that the best SNR for the Pb I 405.78 nm line was achieved for a laser fluence of about 1.4 J cm-2, corresponding to the onset of visible damage on the sample, and an acquisition delay of about 5 ns. When the laser was on resonance a Pb I 405.78 nm signal could however be observed for a fluence as low as 0.25 J cm-2. For fluences greater than about 5 J cm-2, similar results were obtained whether the laser wavelength was tuned on resonance or not. Under these optimal conditions, the relative LoD for lead was estimated to be about 8 parts per million, accumulating over 500 laser shots. This amounts to an improvement of about 11-fold when compared to non-resonant LIBS in typical conditions. The corresponding absolute LoD was estimated to be about 0.8 femtograms and was calculated from optical coherence tomography measurements of the crater profiles. The fact that the best performances of RLIBS were obtained near the onset of visible damage on the sample indicates that this approach is particularly suitable for minimally destructive elemental analysis. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Industrial Materials Institute (IMI-IMI)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271472
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Record identifier6406ec10-ca33-4352-8303-daf9c01b10a4
Record created2014-03-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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