Ex vivo perfusion of the swine heart as a method for pre-transplant assessment

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0267659112449035
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePerfusion (United Kingdom)
ISSN0267-6591
Volume27
Issue5
Pages408413; # of pages: 6
Subjectelectrolyte; animal tissue; article; blood gas; brain stem; cost effectiveness analysis; ex vivo study; heart function; heart preload; heart transplantation; heart ventricle pressure; hematocrit; nonhuman; organ donor; organ perfusion; preoperative evaluation; priority journal; reperfusion; swine; systolic blood pressure; Animals; Extracorporeal Circulation; Heart; Heart Transplantation; Myocardial Reperfusion; Myocardial Reperfusion Injury; Organ Preservation; Perfusion; Risk Assessment; Swine; Tissue Donors
AbstractWe describe a cost-effective, reproducible circuit in a porcine, ex vivo, continuous warm-blood, bi-ventricular, working heart model that has future possibilities for pre-transplant assessment of marginal hearts donated from brain stem dead donors and hearts donated after circulatory determination of death (DCDD).In five consecutive experiments over five days, pressure volume loops were performed. During working mode, the left ventricular end systolic pressure volume relationship (LV ESPVR) was 23.1±11.1 mmHg/ml and the LV preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) was 67.8±7.2. (Standard PVAN analysis software) (Millar Instruments, Houston, TX, USA)All five hearts were perfused for 219±64 minutes and regained normal cardiac function on the perfusion system.They displayed a significant upward and leftward shift of the end systolic pressure volume relationship, a significant increase in preload recruitable stroke work and minimal stiffness. These hearts could potentially be considered for transplantation. The circuit was effective during reperfusion and working modes whilst proving to be successful in maintaining cardiac function in excess of four hours. Using an autologous prime of approximately 20% haematocrit (Hct), electrolytes and blood gases were easy to control within this period using standard perfusion techniques. © The Author(s) 2012.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics (IBD-IBD)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269338
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Record identifier64fd5ce1-56c9-4c5d-b15d-d971e27aeda9
Record created2013-12-12
Record modified2016-05-09
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