Properties of melt-extruded vs. solution-cast proton exchange membranes based on PFSA nanocomposites

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1149/1.3484579
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TypeArticle
Proceedings titlePolymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells 10
Series titleECS Transactions; Volume 33
Conference218th Electrochemical Society Meeting, October 10, 2010, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
ISBN9781566778206
1566778204
Pages855865; # of pages: 11
AbstractThis study examined the relationships between structure/morphology and properties of series of composite proton exchange membranes prepared using two processing techniques; solution-casting and melt-extrusion. Three families of inorganic fillers with different aspect ratios and specific areas have been used; spherical 60 nm SiO2 nanoparticles, fiber-like sepiolite clay, and non-structured mesoporous silica. The results show that composite PEMs present in general higher water uptake than reference membranes; water uptake increases with the specific area of the filler, and translate to lower volume change and higher dimensional stability for the fillers with low specific area. Solution cast membranes show in general higher water uptake than extruded ones that translates to lower volume change and higher dimensional stability of extruded PEMs. Finally conductivity results show that at high levels of hydration, solution-cast membranes have in general higher conductivities than extruded samples, while at high temperature and reduced relative humidity conditions, melt extruded samples show higher conductivities.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Industrial Materials Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number53857
IMI-134412
53858
IMI-134413
NPARC number16898207
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Record identifier6541715f-1ab3-4ded-afe0-3b0dec270f64
Record created2011-02-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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