Bias voltage propagation in a semi-insulator: Effect on the impulse response of an InGaAs:Fe planar photodetector

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1063/1.361001
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal Of Applied Physics
Volume79
Issue3
Pages15781582; # of pages: 5
SubjectCOMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DOPED MATERIALS; GALLIUM ARSENIDES; INDIUM ARSENIDES; IRON ADDITIONS; MSM JUNCTIONS; PHOTODETECTORS; TRANSPORT PROCESSES; TRAPPING; VOLTAGE DEPENDENCE
AbstractA semiconductor with a high resistivity due to a deep trap is called a semi-insulator. A semi-insulator does not always behave like a normal insulator because of so-called bias voltage propagation, which arises from space charge in the deep trap. This effect is a factor in the operation of various devices based on semi-insulators. We investigate by numerical simulation its role in the transient photoresponse of a planar metal�semiconductor�metal photodetector. We simulate a realistic case where the active layer is InGaAs made semi-insulating by addition of Fe. The simulation uses a two-dimensional, drift/diffusion calculation with realistic conditions where the semi-insulating material is represented by a two-level compensation model with Fe as a deep acceptor that compensates shallow n-type impurities. The results give a microscopic picture on a picosecond time scale of factors that affect the transient response: trapping, space charge, propagation of the bias field, and the spatial distribution of the carriers.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12328942
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Record identifier65fea1fb-9b3f-4486-9066-4e78e63b2222
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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