Sintering effects related to filtration properties of porous continuously gradient ceramic structures

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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Membrane Science
Volume183
SubjectCeramic support structure; Functionally gradient material; Porosimetry; Permeation and separation tests
AbstractA single-step processing method has been previously established to prepare porous alumina microstructures by a controlled sedimentation technique whereby fine powder from an aqueous suspension consolidates over a casting slab. Metastable surface chemical control of the suspension properties was able to produce a highly porous flat disc structure with a continuously increasing mean pore size from top to bottom. Formation of this gradient structure was facilitated by using a relatively broad particle size distribution. Top layer pore sizes less than 50 nm have been achieved. Without modification, these structures are suitable for use as ultrafiltration media. The present work presents a comparison of properties and performance data for samples made with the above mentioned functionally gradient characteristics, to samples made with a more uniform microstructure. The effects of sintering time and temperature were analysed in view of overall porosity, pore size distribution and the extent of densification from the green state. These results are presented along with permeation measurements from a filtration test module.
Publication date
Linkhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376738800005998
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number42016
NPARC number8925806
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Record identifier66f4b689-f809-45ed-8e4a-cc139a39faa7
Record created2009-04-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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