High rate electrochemical capacitors from three-dimensional arrays of vanadium nitride functionalized carbon nanotubes

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/jp205052f
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Physical Chemistry C
ISSN1932-7447
Volume115
Issue49
Pages2438124393; # of pages: 13
Subject3D arrays; Charge discharge cycling; Constant current; Direct synthesis; Electrical conductivity; Electrically conductive; Electrochemical capacitor; Functionalized carbon nanotubes; High rate; Inconel; Nanocrystallines; Oxidized surfaces; Rate capabilities; Scan rates; Specific capacitance; Three-dimensional (3D); Vanadium nitrides; Voltage profile; Capacitance; Carbon; Drops; Electric conductivity; Electric discharges; Electrolytic capacitors; Functional materials; Glassy carbon; Nanocrystalline powders; Nitrides; Surface structure; Three dimensional; Vanadium; Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCN)
AbstractA simple methodology is developed to directly synthesize three-dimensional (3D) electrochemically supercapacitive arrays, consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes conformally covered by nanocrystalline vanadium nitride, firmly anchored to glassy carbon or Inconel electrodes. These nanostructures demonstrate a respectable specific capacitance of 289 F g -1, which is achieved in 1 M KOH electrolyte at a scan rate of 20 mV s -1. The well-connected highly electrically conductive structures exhibit a superb rate capability; at a very high scan rate of 1000 mV s -1 there is less than a 20% drop in the capacitance relative to 20 mV s -1. Such rate capability has never been reported for VN and is highly unusual for any other oxide or nitride. These 3D arrays also display nearly ideal triangular voltage profiles during constant current charge-discharge cycling. Analysis of the post-electrochemically cycled samples indicates negligible changes occurring in the VN nanocrystallite morphology, but a modification in the structure of the oxidized surface. We envision that the direct synthesis approach employed in this study may serve as a "drop-in" platform for large-scale commercial fabrication of a variety of carbon nanotube-supported functional materials that require excellent electrical conductivity to the underlying support. © 2011 American Chemical Society.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT-INNT)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271105
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Record identifier66fe337d-3760-42a8-9e6e-6093948e21a3
Record created2014-03-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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