Towards scalable photonics via quantum storage

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Proceedings titleProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
ConferenceAdvances in Slow and Fast Light VI, 3 February 2013 through 5 February 2013, San Francisco, CA
Article number863612
SubjectExperimental demonstrations; Optical quantum-information processing; Quantum Computing; Quantum memory; Quantum-information processing; Single photons; Single-photon source; Time-bandwidth products; Digital storage; Photons; Quantum computers; Quantum optics; Raman scattering; Synchronization; Quantum theory
AbstractSingle photons are a vital resource for optical quantum information processing. efficient and deterministic single photon sources do not yet exist, however. To date, experimental demonstrations of quantum processing primitives have been implemented using non-deterministic sources combined with heralding and/or postselection. Unfortunately, even for eight photons, the data rates are already so low as to make most experiments impracticable. It is well known that quantum memories, capable of storing photons until they are needed, are a potential solution to this 'scaling catastrophe'. Here, we analyze two protocols for generating multiphoton states using quantum memories, showing how the production rates can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude. We identify the time-bandwidth product as a key figure of merit in this connection. © 2013 SPIE.
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AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21270580
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Record identifier67096ae9-446b-493e-8d04-ce9996c61047
Record created2014-02-17
Record modified2016-05-09
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