Canadian research has implications for smoke detectors in homes

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AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleFIRE.GOV
IssueWinter
Pages3
Subjectsmoke alarms, smoke detector; Smoke detection
AbstractWorking with the Underwriters' Laboratories of Canada, researchers in the Fire Risk Management Program of the National Research Council of Canada's Institute for Research in Construction have demonstrated through full-scale experiments that combined ionization-photoelectric smoke detectors, can be, in some cases, more effective than ionization or photoelectric detectors used alone in homes. This research was part of an ongoing effort in the fire protection community to maximize the benefit of current smoke detector technologies to improve residential fire safety. Two houses in the now deserted town of Kemano, British Columbia, served as test sites for the experiments: a 900-square-foot one-story house and a 1400-square-foot two-story house. In both dwellings, the researchers installed groupings of three types of detectors-photoelectric, ionization and combined photoelectric-ionization to determine the response time to various fires set in the structures.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number43973
15642
NPARC number20386120
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Record identifier674f6263-197f-407c-8989-2f82acc2a9e5
Record created2012-07-25
Record modified2016-05-09
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