Pt nanoparticles deposited on TiO2 based nanofibers: Electrochemical stability and oxygen reduction activity

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpowsour.2009.11.107
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Power Sources
Volume195
Pages31053110; # of pages: 5
SubjectCeramic catalyst supports; Nanofibers; Electrochemical stability; Platinum; Oxygen reduction reaction
AbstractThe electrochemical stability of Pt deposited on TiO2 based nanofibers was compared with commercially available carbon supported Pt. Prior to the Pt deposition the TiO2 material, which was either undoped or Nbdoped, was air calcined. In one case the undoped TiO2 was also reduced in a hydrogen atmosphere.XRD analysis revealed that the unreduced TiO2 was present in the anatase phase, irrespective of whether the Nb dopant was present, whereas the rutile phase was formed due to reduction with H2. The diameter of the TiO2 fibers varied from 50 to 100 nm, and the average Pt particle diameter was approximately 5 nm. Pt supported on TiO2 was more stable than Pt supported on C when subjected to 1000 voltammetric cycles in the range of 0.05–1.3V vs. RHE. Nb doped TiO2 showed the highest stability, retaining 60% of the electrochemically active surface area after 1000 cycles compared to the state after 100 cycles, whereas the carbon supported catalyst retained 20% of the active surface area. The commercial catalyst had the highest oxygen reduction activity due to its larger specific area (17.1m2 g−1 vs. 5.0m2 g−1 for Pt/TiO2–Nb, measured after 100 cycles) and the higher support conductivity. The Pt supported on Nb doped or on H2 reduced TiO2 was more active than Pt supported on air calcined and otherwise unmodified TiO2.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number17101719
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Record identifier679ab124-66d0-4e88-9001-9f11475513a0
Record created2011-03-09
Record modified2016-05-09
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