Measurement of paralytic shellfish toxins in molluscan extracts: comparison of the microtitre plate saxiphilin and sodium channel radioreceptor assays with mouse bioassay, HPLC analysis and a commercially available cell culture assay

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/02652030110048594
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TypeArticle
Journal titleFood Additives and Contaminants
ISSN0265-203X
Volume18
Issue11
Pages970980
AbstractThis study compared five methods of measuring paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) including the long-used mouse lethality bioassay, a commercially available cell culture test (MIST® Quantification kit), HPLC analysis, and two newly developed radioreceptor assays utilizing mammalian sodium channels and saxiphilin. Methods were challenged with toxic shellfish extracts prepared according to the AOAC official method. The best correlations between predicted toxicity values being 0.9 or better, were those between HPLC analysis when compared with both radioreceptor assays and the mouse lethality bioassay, as well as that between the saxiphilin and the sodium channel radioreceptor assays. In all cases, statistically significant correlations existed between the toxicity measurements of the same extracts. The ratios between some methods were not unitary as measured by the slopes of the regression lines used for correlation analyses. HPLC analysis predicted more toxicity than all of the bioassays. The saxiphilin assay underestimated toxicity relative to the mouse bioassay, the MIST® kit determinations and the sodium channel assay. The sodium channel assay predicted there to be less toxicity than the mouse bioassay and the MIST® kit. Of all of the techniques used, the MIST® kit correlation with the mouse bioassay was nearest to one. Each method possesses different virtues and it may be that a multi-method approach would harness the benefits of each method for various aspects of a shellfish testing regime.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number23000897
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Record identifier67f51a76-71d6-4f1b-a47e-9aa78c090d11
Record created2016-11-07
Record modified2016-11-08
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