Characterization of the oxidation products of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Characterization of the oxidation products of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/rcm.1290070616
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleRapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry
ISSN0951-4198
1097-0231
Volume7
Issue6
Pages482487
AbstractPeriodate oxidation of the toxins responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) yields fluorescent products that are useful for trace analysis by reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Some toxins are oxidized to the same product, while others are transformed to a mixture of products; in ail cases, the products are too unstable to be isolated preparatively. A mobile phase containing heptafluorobutyric acid as an ion-pair agent was developed to improve compatibility with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis. Several LC/MS techniques were investigated: chemical ionization with the moving belt interface, atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization, thermospray, continuous-flow fast-atom bombardment, and ion-spray. Only LC/ion-spray MS was able to provide spectra of the oxidized products. The products were characterized as purines resulting from: (a) breakage of the C4–C12 bond and aromatization of the remaining rings (loss of 4 hydrogens); (b) partial elimination of a carbamoyl or N-sulfocarbamoyl side-chain (this is promoted by the presence of an N-1-hydroxy group); and (c) partial hydrolysis of an N-suifocarbamoyl side-chain to a carbamoyl group.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001066
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier68c2dcbb-93c9-4f6c-b6e5-b9f220b8dfcc
Record created2016-12-07
Record modified2016-12-07
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)