Comparison of reverberation-room and impedance-tube absorption measurements

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Journal titleJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Pages21712174; # of pages: 4
AbstractReverberation room absorption measurements on some 50 samples of commercial acoustical materials were compared with values predicted from impedance tube measurements on the same materials. The predictions involved calculating the random-incidence absorption for the standard 9x8 ft. patch of material. At frequencies of 125, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 cps, various degrees of correlation were found between impedance tube data and reverberation room results involving mountings 1, 2 and 4 (adhesive, furring strips, and rigid backing, respectively). Of special interest were results at 250 cps in which the absorption was sensitive to type of mounting. For mountings that permitted diaphragm vibration of the material, the reverberation room results were substantially higher than prediced values based on rigidly backed samples. Remnants of this behavior appeared at 500 cps for the thin materials, but otherwise correlation was good at this and higher frequencies. Highly absorptive materials correlated better than those with low absorption, for which reverberation room results still tended to be somewhat higher than was predicted.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number8398
NPARC number20374244
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Record identifier69a7dad0-7e44-4bf7-8d59-e3d15b511d32
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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