Photochemical alkylation of inorganic selenium in the presence of low molecular weight organic acids

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Photochemical alkylation of inorganic selenium in the presence of low molecular weight organic acids (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/es034418j
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleEnvironmental Science and Technology
ISSN0013-936X
Volume37
IssueDecember 15 24
Pages56455650; # of pages: 6
AbstractUsing a flow-through photochemical reactor and a low pressure mercury lamp as a UV source, alkyl selenium species are formed from inorganic selenium(IV) in the presence of low molecular weight organic acids (LMW acids). The volatile alkyl Se species were cryogenically trapped and identified by GC-MS and GC-ICP-MS. In the presence of formic, acetic, propionic and malonic acids, inorganic selenium(IV) is converted by UV irradiation to volatile selenium hydride and carbonyl, dimethylselenide and diethylselenide, respectively. Se(IV) was successfully removed from contaminated agricultural drainage waters (California, U.S.A.) using a batch photoreactor system Se. Photochemical alkylation may thus offer a promising means of converting toxic selenium salts, present in contaminated water, to less toxic dimethylselenide. The LMW acids and photochemical alkylation process may also be key to understanding the source of atmospheric selenium and are likely involved in its mobility in the natural anaerobic environment.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for National Measurement Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
Identifier10300417
NRC number87
NPARC number8899039
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier69cb9ed1-800f-47bb-a4b6-ea0f096038dc
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)