Characterization of sintered titanium/hydroxyapatite biocomposite using FTIR spectroscopy

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s10856-008-3647-3
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine
ISSN1573-4838
Volume20
Issue4
Pages843850; # of pages: 8
Subjecthydroxyapatite; titanium; Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)
AbstractFourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to characterize the phase changes of hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HA) in a titanium/HA biocomposite during sintering. The effects of sintering temperature and the presence of Ti on the decomposition of HA were examined. It was observed that pure HA was stable in argon atmosphere at temperatures up to 1,200°C, although the dehydroxylation of pure HA was promoted by the increase in sintering temperature. In the Ti/HA system, on the other hand, the presence of Ti accelerated dehydroxylation and the decomposition of HA was detected at a temperature as low as 800°C. Tetracalcium phosphate (Ca4P2O9, TTCP) and calcium oxide (CaO) were the dominant products of the decomposition, but no tricalcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2, TCP) was detected due to phosphorus diffusion and possible reactions during the thermal process. The main decomposed constituents of HA in Ti/HA system at high temperatures (≥1,200°C) would be CaO and amorphous phases.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Industrial Materials Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21274315
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Record identifier6c46fb0f-6d79-499f-9dea-cc66650e2818
Record created2015-03-09
Record modified2016-05-09
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