Short range ballistic motion in fluid lipid bilayers studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/c1sm05691c
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TypeArticle
Journal titleSoft Matter
ISSN1744-683X
Volume7
Issue18
Pages83588362; # of pages: 5
SubjectBallistic motions; Experimental evidence; Fluid lipid bilayers; Lateral directions; Length scale; Lipid molecules; Molecular motions; Quasi elastic neutron scattering; Ballistics; Cytology; Diffusion; Neutron scattering
AbstractDiffusion is the primary mechanism for movement of lipids and proteins in the lateral direction of a biological membrane. In this paper we have used quasi-elastic neutron scattering to examine the diffusion process of lipid molecules in fluid DMPC membranes. We found that the motion over length scales greater than the lipid diameter could be characterized as a continuous diffusion process, with a diffusion coefficient of D = 64 × 10 -12 m 2/s. The continuous diffusion model has been successfully used in the past to describe the motion of lipid over long length scales. However, the focus of this measurement was to determine how the character of the molecular motion changes on length scales shorter than the nearest neighbour distance. At very short length scales (<2.37 Å), we see first experimental evidence for a short-range flow-like ballistic motion. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Canadian Neutron Beam Centre
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272022
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Record identifier6c6e4bad-ed7d-45eb-ab54-5da43944634f
Record created2014-05-21
Record modified2016-05-09
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