Changes in free and total plasma cortisol levels in juvenile haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) exposed to long-term handling stress

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2006.09.003
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TypeArticle
Journal titleComparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology
Volume146
Issue1
Pages7886; # of pages: 9
Subjectacute stress; cortisol; free cortisol; glucose; haddock; handling; hsp70; long-term stress; condition factor; fish physiology; gills; growth; hormones; juveniles; marine fish; Melanogrammus aeglefinus
AbstractWe measured changes in free and total plasma cortisol levels, plasma glucose, gill hsp70 levels, and growth in haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) subjected to a long-term handling stress (15 s out of water, each day, for 4 weeks), and the effect of this long-term stress on the ability of haddock to respond to an acute stressor. The acute stressor was a single handling stress, and fish were sampled at 1, 6, and 12 h post-stress. During the long-term stress study, free and total plasma cortisol levels increased significantly (10-fold) in the stressed group after the second week. However, the percentage of free cortisol was already significantly elevated by the first week (control 17%, stressed 55%), and remained high during the second week (control 35% and stressed 65%). After 3 and 4 weeks of handling, both free and total cortisol declined in stressed fish to levels that were not significantly different from pre-stress values. Control fish grew significantly more than stressed fish (by 32% and 18%, respectively) over the 4 week study, and condition factor only increased in control fish. Although fish from the control group showed elevated total plasma cortisol levels (to 47 ng mL?1) 1 h after the acute stress, and the levels in stressed fish were comparable to those for the control fish, no significant increase in plasma cortisol was measured in the group subjected to the long-term stress. Free plasma cortisol levels did not increase significantly in either group following the acute stress. However, free plasma cortisol levels were significantly higher in long-term stress group, as compared with the control group, at 6 h post-stress. Plasma glucose and gill hsp70 levels were not altered by either the long-term stress or acute stressor. Our data indicate that cortisol (free and total), but not glucose or hsp70, appears to be adequate to assess short- and long-term stress in haddock.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
Copyright notice© 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number42628
1239
NPARC number3538332
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Record identifier6c73e74a-2d26-4b12-88db-117168a6ba4e
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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