Dehydration and dehiscence in siliques of Brassica napus and Brassica rapa

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1139/b03-019
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Journal of Botany
Volume81
Pages248254; # of pages: 7
AbstractSilique dehiscence (shattering) in Brassica species has a pronounced effect on agricultural yields. Shattering is highly variable and difficult to quantify, and consequently there have been few studies that explore interspecies variation in shattering in relation to silique development. In this paper, a rapid and simple method has been developed for quantifying silique dehiscence. The variable-speed pod splitter is a mechanical device that provides a measure of the impact force required to trigger shattering of individual siliques. We have used the variable-speed pod splitter to show that siliques of Brassica rapa cv. Parkland were significantly more resistant to shattering than those of Brassica napus cv. Quantum. Siliques of both species became prone to shattering following a short period of rapid dehydration during which their water content fell from approx. 70% to approx. 10% (based on weight). Magnetic resonance imaging of individual siliques of varying ages revealed that water loss occurred from the inside the pericarp in B. napus cv. Quantum and from the outside of the pericarp in B. rapa cv. Parkland. We suggest a mechanism for how this difference in the pattern of water loss contributed to the difference in susceptibility to shatter between the two cultivars.Key words: shattering, magnetic resonance imaging, canola, valve.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Plant Biotechnology Institute
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number2009
NPARC number9742788
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Record identifier6cd9eae4-9f5b-4a27-b83d-2d38fed9f205
Record created2009-07-17
Record modified2016-05-09
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