Evaluation of in situ creep properties of frozen soils with the pressuremeter

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Pages310318; # of pages: 9
SubjectPermafrost; Soils; frozen soils; creep; creep tests; pressure meters; field tests
AbstractA series of field tests was carried out at a permafrost site near Thompson, Manitoba, to investigate the suitability of the Ménard Pressuremeter as a tool for in-situ determination of the rheological properites of frozen soils. Both short- term and long-term tests were conducted using the standard pressuremeter equipment with only minor modifications. Special care was taken in drilling and preparing the borehole for the tests to minimize the temperature disturbance. By using a newly developed method described in the paper, it was possible to obtain from the tests both the short-term and the long-term strength parameters. The first were obtained from conventional type pressuremeter tests, while the latter resulted from stage-loaded creep tests. In addition to the time dependent strength, the constitutive creep equation of the frozen soil was also established from the pressuremeter creep tests. The pressuremeter technique was found to be quite promising for creep testing of frozen soils. Its main advantages over laboratory methods used for similar purpose is that it is quicker, less expensive and involves a relatively large volume of soil. Its drawback is that it furnishes information on the soil behavior in only one direction, i.e., normal to the axis of the borehole which may be insufficient for foundation design if the permafrost stratum is anisotropic and contains horizontal ice lenses and layers.
Publication date
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C., Publ.
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number13845
NPARC number20374521
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Record identifier6d32e096-e47d-4e38-a5fd-fdacd4f60c41
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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