Use of silicone membranes to enhance gas transfer during microbial fuel cell operation on carbon monoxide

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2011.09.057
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBioresource Technology
Volume102
Issue23
Pages1089810906; # of pages: 9
SubjectMicrobial fuel cell; Carbon monoxide; Silicone membrane; Gas transfer
AbstractElectricity generation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) using carbon monoxide (CO) or synthesis gas (syngas) as a carbon source has been demonstrated recently. A major challenge associated with CO or syngas utilization is the mass transfer limitation of these sparingly soluble gases in the aqueous phase. This study evaluated the applicability of a dense polymer silicone membrane and thin wall silicone tubing for CO mass transfer in MFCs. Replacing the sparger used in our previous study with the membrane systems for CO delivery resulted in improved MFC performance and CO transformation efficiency. A power output and CO transformation efficiency of up to 18 mW LR-1 (normalized to anode compartment volume) and 98%, respectively, was obtained. The use of membrane systems offers the advantage of improved mass transfer and reduced reactor volume, thus increasing the volumetric power output of MFCs operating on a gaseous substrate such as CO. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Biotechnology Research Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number53384
NPARC number18942976
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Record identifier6f4d98d6-0249-44a6-8648-745214911019
Record created2012-03-06
Record modified2016-05-09
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