Natural Marine Exposure Results for Reinforced Concrete Slabs with Corrosion Inhibitors

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TypeArticle
Journal titleCement and Concrete Composites Journal (25) Theme Issue on Concrete Durability
Subjectchlorides; corrosion; cracking; inhibitor; marine exposure; reinforced concrete
AbstractReinforced concrete slabs were cast with a concrete cover of 20 mm. The water-to-cement ratio was 0.40, and the concrete slabs were either uncracked or precracked. A simulated crack 0.2 or 0.4 mm wide was formed transverse to the axis of the reinforcing bar during the casting. Two types of commercial corrosion inhibitors were added to concrete mixtures for corrosion protection. Slabs were placed about 1 m below high tide at the Treat Island, Maine, USA, natural marine exposure site. The specimens were visually inspected and the corrosion rates were measured annually using the linear polarization technique. Some of the concrete slabs were broken open after 12 months of exposure and corrosion damage was evaluated. Water-soluble chloride content analysis was performed at this time. After three years of exposure, it was found, that both corrosion inhibitors were effective in reducing the corrosion rate for uncracked concrete slabs, but relatively ineffective in preventing localised corrosion of reinforcing steel in the crack area for precracked concrete slabs.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Information Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number45795
NPARC number5765262
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Record identifier700e8a25-8238-42ae-9813-9e773e0947b5
Record created2009-03-29
Record modified2016-05-09
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